Menu
Home Page

Henley Green

...it’s our place to shine!

Search
Translate

Forest Schools

                                               

    Welcome to the Forest School Home Learning Page! 

Here you will find lots of activities each week that you could try at home.

 

 

Go on a minibeast hunt

Spring is well and truly kicking in now, and the warmer weather will bring lots of creepy crawlies out. So get your kids out in the fresh air and take a closer look at your garden. You'll soon notice it's teeming with wildlife! Can you find...

  • a worm after a spring shower
  • a bumblebee looking for nectar
  • a spotty ladybird exploring the grass
  • a slimy snail in a dark damp spot
  • a butterfly basking in the sunshine?

Look at the minibeast identification sheet and see how many you can find. Remember to be gentle if you touch a minibeast and always put it back where you have found it. If you touch a minibeast, then make sure that you wash your hands. 

      

After you have found your minibeasts, see if you can move like minibeasts!

This is a great way to get active and help burn off some excess energy. You can do it outdoors or inside.  Challenge yourself to:

  • lie on the ground and wriggle like a worm
  • flap your arms like a butterfly flutters its wings
  • put your hands on the floor and scuttle about like a spider
  • do some giant leaps like a cricket
  • crawl on the floor then curl up into a ball like a woodlouse.

Toilet Roll Bird Nest

Toilet Roll Bird Nest  1
Don't forget to check out our Forest School Page to see what we were up to while we were at school.

The Wildlife Trust have the 30 Days Wild challenge to do 1 wild thing a day throughout June. Sign up to receive a free activity pack with additional resources sent out throughout June. They also have a great collection of nature-based activities you can do during lockdown

www.wildlifetrusts.org/ 

A Year in the Life of an Ash Tree | Woodland Trust

Common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is found across Europe, from the Arctic Circle to Turkey, and it is the third most common tree in Britain. Watch as this ash tree as it changes through the seasons.

Top